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PenlessEJ

May 2017

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Bathroom Book

Death of the Liberal Class - Chris Hedges

Periodical

The Economist: Trumponomics What it is, and why its dangerous (May 13th - 19th, 2017)
The Economist 1843: Teaching robots right from wrong (June & July 2017)

Evening Read

Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to Globalization of Democracy - Francis Fukuyama

Death of the Liberal Class by Peter Hedges has moved from being my evening read to my bathroom read. It is a quick book that I have already picked up the theme from in the opening introduction. Sadly, I am reading it now just to finish it and make sure that I do not miss any points. The Economist is on my hit list this week for the periodical. I should mention that I hold subsciptions for four periodicals that I read on a regular basis: The Economist, Foreign Affairs, Maclean's and Lapham's Quarterly. You will see issues of particular note rotate weekly through this post. If robotics is an interest of yours, I recommend tracking down the most recent issue of The Economist 1843 magazine. Trump continues to dominate my periodicals. And lastly, I am re-reading Political Order and Political Decay by my favourite social scientist Francis Fukyama. This is just because I love reading this stuff and maybe I am feeling a little more decay these days among our political institutions.
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Bathroom Book

Nil (what's wrong with me, oh yeah hernia makes reading in the heads too painful to read concurrently)

Periodical


Foriegn Affairs May/June 2017 - Present at the Destruction

Evening Read


Death of the Liberal Class - Chris Hedges

I finished Through the Eye of a Needle by Peter Brown while nursing a hangover on Saturday. It was okay. It would have been better had I not been exposed to the wonderful historical writings of Mary Beard, but then I also would have not understood most of what is assumed to be known by Brown in his book. I found it to be your typical historical book, dry with puncutations of interesting events that get drawn out too far for too long. Beard on the other hand was a refreshing read and that I think is what makes her popular with the masses. Also, still working on the most recent issue of FA, very interesting reads on the Trump administration and the future of the US as the leader of the liberal order on the international stage. Again, if this stuff interests/concerns you I suggest you find a copy for yourself.

Unrelated information: I did not post a Fitbit update today because I was too busy Sunday evening to download the information. Next week I will provide double information. But to be honest, I am debating dropping that particular weekly post.

Now tell me, what is the largest book you have ever read and how long did it take you to get through it?
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What I'm Reading Wednesday II

Wednesday, 3 May 2017 10:20 am
penlessej: (Books)
Bathroom Book

Canada's National Security in the Post-9/11 World: Strategy, Interests and Threats - David S. McDonough (editor)

Periodical

Foriegn Affairs May/June 2017 - Present at the Destruction

Evening Read

Through the Eye of a Needle: Wealth, the Fall of Rome and the Making of Christianity in the West, 230 - 550 AD - Peter Brown

McDonough's book is good. It is a collection of essays from various subject matter experts on Canada's national security. I enjoy it as a bathroom book because I can usually get in an essay with each major visit. Still working through Brown's book, I am not advancing through this as quickly as I would like to because of work, but such is life. And if this whole Trump as President thing is still terrifying to you, I suggest you go out and purchase the current edition of Foreign Affairs because so far the articles on the topic (note the headline article, fitting if you as me) are on point and very informative.
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I figured that I will join the bandwagon and start a regular post each week with what I am reading (warning, I have a very broad taste in books, and I usually have more than one on the go at any time.) I tend to read certain books at certain periods in my day (hence the breakdown in this post).

Bathroom Book
(yes, the book I keep in the washroom and read through as I do my business)

Wisdom of the Popes: A collection of statements by the Popes since Peter on a Variety of Social and Religious Issues - Thomas J. Craughwell (editor)

Periodical

Lapham's Quarterly Volume X, Number 2 (Spring 2017) "Discovery"

Evening Read

Through the Eye of a Needle: Wealth, the Fall of Rome and the Making of Christianity in the West, 230 - 550 AD - Peter Brown

This is my second go at finishing Peter Brown's book. I started reading it last summer after some strong reviews here on DW but was side tracked when I realized that I was not up on my Roman history enough to fully appreciate what I was reading. A friend here recommended SPQR by Mary Beard to catch up, and I ended up eating that whole book up in the span of a week at sea. I honestly completely forgot about picking the Brown book back up, but alas I have it now and I am working through it.

Lapham's Quarterly, if you are not already aware of the publication, is an amazing periodical that is published four times each year. The periodical itself has a theme for each publication that is simple and yet extremely complex. For Spring 2017 the theme is Discovery. The magazine (it really is more like a book), is full of historical stories, biographies, letters, extracts from historical writings, etc that are all curated by the good people at Lapham's around the particular theme. In this issue, I was particularly moved by a piece written by Galileo Galilei about reaching for the stars.

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